Royal Recipes: Elderflower and Lemon Cake

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On my Royal recipes series I usually use recipes that the Royal family would have. For the recipe I’m sharing today, Elderflower and Lemon Cake, I’m using the flavours Meghan chose for the cake, as a twist to a Victoria sponge. I’ve made the elderflower and lemon cake for Saturday, when we’ve watched the Royal wedding. Of course, we’ve also had something else, an afternoon tea (link to my lifestyle blog).
To decorate I’ve used Italian meringue, an white and fluffy decor, perfect for a wedding cake. As Meghan wanted real flowers on the cake, I did use some flowers I’ve had in the freezer, dried from last year’s pick. I like to grow my own edible flowers and considering the Royal family’s approach to produce (locally sourced, organic if it’s possible), it seemed very appropriate.

Elderflower and Lemon Cake

The cream is a mixture of creme patisserie and lemon curd, a bit unusual, but it works. I wanted the cake to be light, hence not making a buttercream for the filling. I’m happy I didn’t make the cake before, because it turned out so good that we’ve finished it in two days. That is not great for my waistline.
For the Elderflower taste I’ve used cordial. I think the taste is wonderful, I’ve enjoyed it. It was the first time I bought cordial, but it will not be the last.

Elderflower and Lemon Cake Slice

Ingredients for Elderflower and Lemon Cake, 8 slices:

– 225g self-raising white flour
– 200g butter, soften
– 175g sugar
– 4 free-range eggs
– 100ml Elderflower Cordial
– 25g mixed peel
– 1 tsp baking powder
– 25ml lemon juice
– 500 ml milk
– 100g sugar
– 3 yolks
– 60g white flour
– 100g lemon curd
– 4 egg whites
– 200g sugar (for the Italian meringue)
– 100 ml water
– edible flowers for decor

Preheat the oven at 180C or 160C fan.

In the bowl of the stand mixer, put the flour, the soften butter, the eggs, the baking powder, the cordial, the mixed peel, the lemon juice, and the sugar. Mix it for a minute at slow speed. Continue to mix and increase the speed. Mix until all the ingredients are incorporated.
Line two 20cm sandwich tins with baking paper. Scoop the cake batter into the baking trays. Bake for 25 minutes or until it springs back if touched. When the sponges are baked, take them out of the oven and leave them to cool for a couple of minutes in the trays. Take the sponges out of the trays and leave them to cool completely on a cooling rack.

Meanwhile make the cream patisserie. Heat the milk in a saucepan. While the milk is heating, in a bowl, whisk the yolks with sugar until they are pale. Sift the flour on top and whisk. When the milk has boiled, pour it over the egg mixture. Mix for one minute or so. Now pour the creme back into the saucepan, over medium heat. Stir continuously for 2-3 minutes. When the cream has thicken a bit it’s ready. Take it off the heat and let it to cool down. Stir the cream so it gets colder quicker.

Mix the creme patisserie with the lemon curd. Put the first sponge on the serving plate. Spread half of the cream on top and place the second sponge on top. Cover the cake with the rest of the cream.

Make the Italian meringue. Whisk the egg whites until they fluff. Meanwhile, put the sugar with the water into a pan over high heat and bring to boil (117C). When the sugar is ready, pour it over the egg whites and whisk at high speed until the sugar is incorporated.

Scoop the meringue on the cake, creating peaks. On the sides, you can use a spoon. Stick it to the meringue, when you press it off it will create lovely nice small peaks. Put the edible flowers on top of the cake and now it’s ready to be served. Chill until you enjoy it.

Elderflower and Lemon Cake with the afternoon tea

Besides the cake, I’ve made scones, Mac and cheese, sandwiches, set yoghurt, passion fruit cheesecake, and trifle.

Have you seen the Royal wedding? Have you ever had an Elderflower and lemon cake before?

Only Crumbs Remain

5 thoughts on “Royal Recipes: Elderflower and Lemon Cake

  1. What a beautiful cake! I make elderflower cordial every year, but I have rarely used it for baking, I’d love to try it in this cake. 🙂

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