Smoky Bread

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With the amount of bread recipes I’ve shared so far on my blog, one would have imagined that there aren’t any news ones I can think of. Well, that’s not me. I love eating bread and baking bread. This time I was curious how the bread will turn out if I add liquid smoke in it. I bought liquid smoke a couple of months ago and I’ve been using it in different recipes. Today it was the first time I baked with this new ingredient and I had no idea if the taste will go through. It did and so I’m sharing the recipe with my readers.

Smoky Bread

I’ve enjoyed the bread a lot and this means that I will make it again, with wholemeal and white flour. This time I’ve made it with rye and white, 50-50. I’ve made rye bread before, as a plait and it was lovely. Also, rye gives the bread a different texture, it makes it more dense and, for me, this works great with a more intense flavour, like the smoky one.

Ingredients for 1 Smoky Bread loaf:

– 250g rye flour
– 250g strong white flour
– 10g easy bake yeast
– 350 ml lukewarm water
– 1 spoon of liquid smoke
– salt

Mix the two types of flour together. Put the salt on a side, making sure it will not touch the year. Make a well in the middle of the flour and put the yeast in the well. Pour the water and the liquid smoke. Mix with the standing mixer for 6 to 7 minutes. If you don’t have or you don’t want to use a stand mixer, start by incorporating the water into the flour with a spoon. Tip the dough on the worktop and knead for about 10 minutes.

Put the loaf into a baking tray that was oiled. Leave the bread to rise for about 30 minutes, or until it doubled in size.

Preheat the oven at 200C or 180C fan for fan ovens. Bake the bread for 30 to 40 minutes. Try it with a wooden skewer to see if the bread is cooked all the way through. I baked mine for 40 minutes today. Take it out and transfer it on a cooling rack.

Have you ever had smoky bread before? Is it something you’d like to try?

4 thoughts on “Smoky Bread

  1. I would never in a million years have thought to put liquid smoke in bread! I can see how it might work best in a darker bread like rye or pumpernickel. I keep a bottle on hand for a few recipes that call for it, but I might have to try it this way at some point.
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