Kiflice

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

These lovely filled biscuits are called Kiflice or Kifle and they are Croatian. I made these to mark today’s semifinals in the World Cup, when England plays Croatia for a place in the final. It’s so exciting. I can’t wait!

Kiflice are biscuits made with a special dough, filled with jam. The dough is special because it has sour cream in it. I loved working with it, is malleable and soft. It tastes delicious too. Without the bit of sugar I’ve added in it, it might make for a lovely savoury pastry, to use for a quiche or a pie. I’ve seen recipes for Kiflice that don’t have any fillings in them, so they can be both sweet or savoury, depending on what you are serving them with.

Kiflice

The recipe I’ve made is a mix of two recipes I’ve found from Croatians. Both said that there are many ways to make these biscuits, with different kind of dough. Therefore, I made my own version. It did also involve a bit of translating with google translate from Croatian, to figure out how to make them as authentic as possible.

I’ve used Damson jam because it was the only one I found in the shop the day before. You can use plum jam, apricot jam, anything that is less syrupy and more compact. If you are trying to cut down on sugar, or you are planning to make these for a children’s party, then use sugar-free jam, that is available in shops.

Ingredients for 20 Kiflice:

– 275g plain white flour + 25g more for dusting
– 125g butter, cut in cubes
– 1 egg
– 100g sour cream
– 25g sugar
– 1 tsp baking powder
– 1 tsp vanilla essence
– Damson jam
– 1 heaped teaspoon of icing sugar for dusting

In a bowl, put the flour, baking powder, and the butter. Rub it together in the hands until it resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg, sugar, vanilla, and sour cream. Mix with a spoon. Tip it over the worktop and knead until it forms a dough.

Roll the dough on the worktop. Gather it up, and roll it again, repeating a couple of times. Gather up the dough, make into a ball, cover it with cling film and put it in the fridge for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 180C or 160C for fan assisted ovens.

How to make Kiflice

Cut the dough in half. I would suggest using the scale to make sure both pieces have the same weight. Roll the dough on the worktop. Dust with flour if you notice that it sticks to the worktop. Cut a perfect circle using a plate for guidance. Take the plate off with care, remove the remaining dough. Now is time to cut the dough like a pizza. Start by cutting in half, then fours, then cut the piece in half again.
Put a teaspoon of jam on the wider part. Do not put too much, or it will get out and burn when the Kiflice are baked. Roll the dough, starting from the wider part towards the narrow end. It will look like a croissant, but smaller. Now you can give them the shape of a crescent, or leave them as they are. Put the biscuits on a baking tray lined with baking paper.

I’ve made them on a very hot day, as it was during these last couple of weeks in Britain, and it was hard to roll. On a cooler day, I imagine the Kiflice rolls would look much nicer, tidier.

Bake for around 15 to 20 minutes. Take the trays out when the biscuits are done. Transfer them on a cooling rack and allow them to cool down completely. When they are cold, put some icing sugar in a small sieve and sprinkle the sugar over the biscuits. Don’t do this while the biscuits are warm or the sugar will melt.

Kiflice on a cooling rack

Have you had Kiflice before?

5 thoughts on “Kiflice

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.